Episode 105: A conversation with Joanne Cacciatore on therapeutic approaches to grief counseling

Dr. Cacciatore specializes in counseling those affected by traumatic death.  She works with and counsels families from all around the world who have experienced catastrophic deaths. Her therapeutic interventions are always presence-and-mindfulness based and include narrative, dialectical, and trauma-focused therapies. She also teaches meditation, mindfulness, and compassion and ahimsa practices to students and clients from around the world.

As an advocate of “green” mental health care after a traumatic experience, she is a member of the American Psychotherapy Association, the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education, the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, and the National Center for Crisis Management. She spearheaded and directs the graduate Certificate in Trauma and Bereavement program at ASU.

Her research has been published extensively in peer reviewed journals such as The Lancet, Birth, Death Studies, Omega Journal of Death and Dying, Social Work, Social Work and Healthcare, and Families in Society.

Dr. Cacciatore received her Doctorate from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and her Masters degree and Bachelor’s degree in psychology from Arizona State University.  Her work has been featured in major media sources such as People and Newsweek magazines, the New York Times, Boston Globe, CNN, National Public Radio, and the Los Angeles Times.

She has been the recipient of many regional and national awards for her empathic work and service to people suffering traumatic grief. Among them, the Hon Kachina Award in 2007, the Sr Teresa Compassionate Care Award, the Empathic Therapist of the Year Award, Arizona Foothills Arizona Women Who Move the Valley Award, and the Parents of Murdered Children Father Ken Czillinger Award.

Health Check: Impact of Drinking on Health

The news tells you drinking a glass of red wine each night improves health, but news outlets also say anyone under 40 shouldn’t drink any alcohol. The impact of alcohol on health is not always obvious and let’s face it – health is likely lowest on the priority when out there indulging. Mike and Glenn know from experience and have seen close friends suffer physically from negative impacts on alcoholism on their health. Listen in as Glenn compares alcohol to rat poison and Mike talks about mental health, stress and watching friends pay the ultimate physical price – losing your liver.

If you know someone who needs to hear this episode, share it with them!

Want more clinical information about the Impact of Alcoholism on Health?

Visit Care Addiction Center’s Resources For Recovery Blog: https://www.careaddiction.com/edu/effects-of-alcohol-on-health

Mentioned in this podcast:

9 Habits Linked To A Longer, Happier Life: https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/23/health/longevity-live-longer-tips-wellness/index.html

Alcohol Is Never Good For People Under 40: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jul/14/alcohol-is-never-good-for-people-under-40-global-study-finds

For more about this podcast:

Visit Sober.Coffee website: https://www.sober.coffee

Recorded at Audiohive Podcasting: https://www.audiohivepodcasting.com

In collaboration with Care Addiction Center: https://www.careaddiction.com

Episode 104: Part two of the conversation with Thomas Attig on his book, “Catching your breath in grief.”

Tom is also a well-known speaker, having offered conference programs across the United States, Canada, and Japan and in England, Australia, Israel, and Germany as well as innumerable talks and workshops for nurses, physicians, funeral directors, clinical psychologists, social service providers, gerontologists, hospice workers, bereavement coordinators, clergy, educators, civic organizations and the general public.

He taught philosophy at Bowling Green State University for nearly twenty-five years, serving as Department Chair for eleven years and leading efforts to establish the first Ph.D. in Applied Philosophy in the world in 1987. Tom left as Professor Emeritus in Philosophy in 1995 to become an independent applied philosopher. A Past President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, he also served as Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors of the International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement.

Key Learning: “Never Go Back”

Do you have relationships that are hurting your efforts to sobriety? Over a cup of coffee, Glenn shares his catalyst to moving towards sobriety – starting by getting out of a strenuous relationship because he was trying to get sober on a foundation that shook. 

Dr. Henry Cloud, in his book “Never Go Back: 10 Things You’ll Never Do Again” gives this advice: do the hard thing. When you recognize you’re in a situation where you’re back-and-forth, back-and-forth – do the hard thing and get out of that situation. Your life is going to suck for six months. But at the six month mark you’ll look back and say “my life is so much better”.

If you know someone who needs to hear this episode, share it with them!

Mentioned in this episode:

Song: Never Go Back Again by Fleetwood Mac: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HM6FrSitvc

Book: Never Go Back by Dr Henry Cloud: https://www.amazon.com/Never-Go-Back-Things-Youll/dp/1451669313/

For more about this podcast:

Visit Sober.Coffee website: https://www.sober.coffee/

Recorded at Audiohive Podcasting: https://www.audiohivepodcasting.com/

A conversation with Thomas Attig on his book, “Catching your breath in grief.”

Tom is also a well-known speaker, having offered conference programs across the United States, Canada, and Japan and in England, Australia, Israel, and Germany as well as innumerable talks and workshops for nurses, physicians, funeral directors, clinical psychologists, social service providers, gerontologists, hospice workers, bereavement coordinators, clergy, educators, civic organizations and the general public.

He taught philosophy at Bowling Green State University for nearly twenty-five years, serving as Department Chair for eleven years and leading efforts to establish the first Ph.D. in Applied Philosophy in the world in 1987. Tom left as Professor Emeritus in Philosophy in 1995 to become an independent applied philosopher. A Past President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, he also served as Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors of the International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement.