Episode 106: A conversation with Suzy Hopkins and Hallie Bateman on their book, “What to do when I am gone.”

Suzy Hopkins is a retired journalist who worked for four Northern California newspapers, then founded and ran a community magazine in the Sierra foothills for 10 years. 

Hallie Bateman is a writer and illustrator based in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Buzzfeed and many others. Together Suzy and Hallie created the book: What to Do When I’m Gone: A Mother’s Wisdom to Her Daughter.

Episode 105: A conversation with Joanne Cacciatore on therapeutic approaches to grief counseling

Dr. Cacciatore specializes in counseling those affected by traumatic death.  She works with and counsels families from all around the world who have experienced catastrophic deaths. Her therapeutic interventions are always presence-and-mindfulness based and include narrative, dialectical, and trauma-focused therapies. She also teaches meditation, mindfulness, and compassion and ahimsa practices to students and clients from around the world.

As an advocate of “green” mental health care after a traumatic experience, she is a member of the American Psychotherapy Association, the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education, the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, and the National Center for Crisis Management. She spearheaded and directs the graduate Certificate in Trauma and Bereavement program at ASU.

Her research has been published extensively in peer reviewed journals such as The Lancet, Birth, Death Studies, Omega Journal of Death and Dying, Social Work, Social Work and Healthcare, and Families in Society.

Dr. Cacciatore received her Doctorate from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and her Masters degree and Bachelor’s degree in psychology from Arizona State University.  Her work has been featured in major media sources such as People and Newsweek magazines, the New York Times, Boston Globe, CNN, National Public Radio, and the Los Angeles Times.

She has been the recipient of many regional and national awards for her empathic work and service to people suffering traumatic grief. Among them, the Hon Kachina Award in 2007, the Sr Teresa Compassionate Care Award, the Empathic Therapist of the Year Award, Arizona Foothills Arizona Women Who Move the Valley Award, and the Parents of Murdered Children Father Ken Czillinger Award.

Episode 104: Part two of the conversation with Thomas Attig on his book, “Catching your breath in grief.”

Tom is also a well-known speaker, having offered conference programs across the United States, Canada, and Japan and in England, Australia, Israel, and Germany as well as innumerable talks and workshops for nurses, physicians, funeral directors, clinical psychologists, social service providers, gerontologists, hospice workers, bereavement coordinators, clergy, educators, civic organizations and the general public.

He taught philosophy at Bowling Green State University for nearly twenty-five years, serving as Department Chair for eleven years and leading efforts to establish the first Ph.D. in Applied Philosophy in the world in 1987. Tom left as Professor Emeritus in Philosophy in 1995 to become an independent applied philosopher. A Past President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, he also served as Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors of the International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement.

A conversation with Thomas Attig on his book, “Catching your breath in grief.”

Tom is also a well-known speaker, having offered conference programs across the United States, Canada, and Japan and in England, Australia, Israel, and Germany as well as innumerable talks and workshops for nurses, physicians, funeral directors, clinical psychologists, social service providers, gerontologists, hospice workers, bereavement coordinators, clergy, educators, civic organizations and the general public.

He taught philosophy at Bowling Green State University for nearly twenty-five years, serving as Department Chair for eleven years and leading efforts to establish the first Ph.D. in Applied Philosophy in the world in 1987. Tom left as Professor Emeritus in Philosophy in 1995 to become an independent applied philosopher. A Past President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, he also served as Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors of the International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement.

Episode 101: A Conversation with Katie Duncan

Katie is a practicing adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner. She is also the founder and CEO of Death Care Coach, a company offering end-of-life guidance, consulting, education, and coaching to families, caregivers, and healthcare providers. Before founding Death Care Coach, she taught full-time as a Professor at Drexel University in the College of Nursing and Health Professions Undergraduate Program, and an adjunct Professor in the Nurse Practitioner Program. 

Duncan has been working in healthcare for over 10 years in various roles and various specialties. She has spent time in hospital and intensive care settings. She has also worked in home-care and community settings, navigating her way into diverse homes while developing strong, trusting relationships with her patients and their families. In addition, Duncan has spent time in sub-acute rehab, assisted living, independent living, nursing home, and long-term care facilities. She continues to be an everlasting student continuously learning from those who allow her the privilege of being at their bedside, especially as they journey through their dying process.

Of all the places Duncan has worked, her greatest love has always been end-of-life hospice care. It has been her honor to be at the bedside of irreplaceable fellow humans as they take their last breaths in their physical bodies. Their journeys have taught her that life is a precious gift, and there is an opportunity to find beauty even at the very end. As a result, Duncan has made it her mission to educate, coach, and provide holistic services focusing on end-of-life matters. 

Episode 99: A conversation with Dr. Linita Eapen Mathew on grief

She received the Canadian Association of Teacher Education (2021) thesis and dissertation award for her work’s contribution to teacher education. Using her skills and expertise for service, she created and led numerous Grief and Writing Through Grief workshops for educators and bereavement support centers across North America. Apart from being an educator, she is a writer at heart and has released two books based on her doctoral dissertation: Life: To Be Given Back Again to Whence It Came and the companion stories The Revelations of Eapen.

 

Links:

 

Book 1: “Life: To Be Given Back Again to Whence It Came” – A dissection of prolonged grief, cultural grief illiteracy, the healing power of rituals and communal grieving, and an analysis of the impact of expressive storytelling on bereavement can be viewed here: www.diopress.com/life

 

Book 2: “The Revelations of Eapen” – The author’s intimate exploration of eastern and western cultural interactions with the phenomenon of grief before, during, and after her father’s death can be viewed here: www.diopress.com/revelations-of-eapen

 

Academic Article: “Braiding western and eastern cultural rituals in bereavement: An autoethnography of healing the pain of prolonged grief” – https://doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2021.1983158

Episode 98: A conversation with legendary music therapist Dr. Russell Hilliard.

His research, advocacy, and consultation have resulted in the development of first- time music therapy programs in hospices throughout the nation, thereby creating many new music therapy positions. He is the author of the text, Hospice and Palliative Care Music Therapy: A Guide to Program Development and Clinical Care, and his research has been published in a wide variety of scholarly journals. He also wrote a chapter titled, Music and Grief Work with Children and Adolescents, in a book titled Creative Interventions with Traumatized Children, edited by Cathy A. Malchiodi. Dr. Hilliard has provided keynote addresses for healthcare conferences and is a frequent presenter at professional conferences worldwide.

Episode 97: A Conversation with Dr. Sarah H. Cross on issues regarding transition to hospice care

She has published more than 20 peer-reviewed articles in journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. Her research has been covered by media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Reuters, and NPR. Prior to pursuing her PhD in public policy from the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, Dr. Cross spent several years as a social worker in home hospice and inpatient palliative care. Dr. Cross’ current research priorities are identifying, understanding, and improving the experiences of people facing structural inequities at end of life, particularly poverty.